Freeze Frame

Although I’m a better photographer and filmmaker than I am a surfer, I do have a passion for riding waves. I’m often inspired to combine those interests through my portraits and documentaries. My latest project captures 50 individual surfers just as they emerged from the frigid winter and spring waters of Montauk’s Ditch Plains beach. The series is called “Freeze Frame”. I’m very excited to announce that the beautiful Hero Beach Club in Montauk is hosting an exhibition of my portraits on Saturday September 21. Here’s a sneak preview of some of the photographs along with a behind the scenes production shot.

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I set up this canopy to soften the midday light and asked anyone who came out of the water at Ditch Plains beach in Montauk if they’d let me take their portrait. Thankfully, almost no one refused. Each session only lasted about 3 minutes.My subjects were often pretty cold from having just left water temperatures ranging from 35 to 50 degrees. Air temperatures were around 30 to 50 degrees, usually with a stiff wind to make it feel even colder.

Executive Action Around the World

I recently completed an exciting and ambitious assignment for a long-time client. The goal was to create a photographic library that portrays their people working together in a dynamic way in different environments and cultures. With more than 500 offices worldwide to choose from, the client narrowed our locations to a single city in each of eleven countries on six continents.

I recently completed an exciting and ambitious assignment for a long-time client. The goal was to create a photographic library that portrays their people working together in a dynamic way in different environments and cultures. With more than 500 offices worldwide to choose from, the client narrowed our locations to a single city in each of eleven countries on six continents.


LONDON: THE offices have a large terrace… —just the thing to provide a sense of place.

LONDON: THE offices have a large terrace… —just the thing to provide a sense of place.

MILAN: As one might expect, the Milan offices are beautifully designed.

MILAN: As one might expect, the Milan offices are beautifully designed.

ALWAYS: Close-ups infuse a meeting with warmth and personality.

ALWAYS: Close-ups infuse a meeting with warmth and personality.

DUBAI: Most of the client’s employees here wear standard Western business attire, but this isn’t mandated. Showing traditional garb in the workplace provides a sense of place and diversity.

DUBAI: Most of the client’s employees here wear standard Western business attire, but this isn’t mandated. Showing traditional garb in the workplace provides a sense of place and diversity.

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JOHANNESBURG: These employees are enjoying doing business outdoors on a beautiful day — and what a pleasure for me.

JOHANNESBURG: These employees are enjoying doing business outdoors on a beautiful day — and what a pleasure for me.

TOKYO: I’ve worked in Tokyo many times over the years for various clients. The office windows are always remarkably clean—a plus for photography. And the people I’m photographing always seem not just professional, but dedicated.

TOKYO: I’ve worked in Tokyo many times over the years for various clients. The office windows are always remarkably clean—a plus for photography. And the people I’m photographing always seem not just professional, but dedicated.


NATURALLY: I like to take advantage of natural light to evoke an open, bright, modern look.

NATURALLY: I like to take advantage of natural light to evoke an open, bright, modern look.

SINGAPORE: Lobby areas frequently provide the most attractive settings, with lots of leeway for compositional options.

SINGAPORE: Lobby areas frequently provide the most attractive settings, with lots of leeway for compositional options.


SYDNEY: Shooting in Australia always leave me with such positive impressions. The executives in this shot really seem to know how to enjoy their work. They all have great senses of humor—perhaps all that sunshine helps. Directing scenes like this one call for me to be a bit of an acting coach. It’s gratifying to see my subjects rise to the occasion!

SYDNEY: Shooting in Australia always leave me with such positive impressions. The executives in this shot really seem to know how to enjoy their work. They all have great senses of humor—perhaps all that sunshine helps. Directing scenes like this one call for me to be a bit of an acting coach. It’s gratifying to see my subjects rise to the occasion!


SYDNEY: A meeting on the go, with Sydney’s ferry terminal in the background, is particularly energetic. I like to get my subjects to forget that they’re being photographed in a public place.

SYDNEY: A meeting on the go, with Sydney’s ferry terminal in the background, is particularly energetic. I like to get my subjects to forget that they’re being photographed in a public place.

SÃO PAOLO: My own heritage, going way back, is Portuguese, but I don’t even speak menu Portuguese. Almost all of the employees I met, on all six continents, spoke fluent English—which was convenient but humbling. Over the years shooting around the world, I’ve developed a repertoire of hand gestures and body language that works surprisingly well.

SÃO PAOLO: My own heritage, going way back, is Portuguese, but I don’t even speak menu Portuguese. Almost all of the employees I met, on all six continents, spoke fluent English—which was convenient but humbling. Over the years shooting around the world, I’ve developed a repertoire of hand gestures and body language that works surprisingly well.


Close-up from a São Paolo meeting

Close-up from a São Paolo meeting

MEXICO CITY: We photographed many indoor and outdoor situations, all with their executives at work. Most of my subjects find our shoots to be a lot of fun and a chance to help show what it means to be part a great company. I try to show the intensity of a dynamic meeting and that often requires much directing and encouragement for my non-professional models.

MEXICO CITY: We photographed many indoor and outdoor situations, all with their executives at work. Most of my subjects find our shoots to be a lot of fun and a chance to help show what it means to be part a great company. I try to show the intensity of a dynamic meeting and that often requires much directing and encouragement for my non-professional models.


DALLAS: The building manager generously permitted us to to do this shot in the lobby of my client’s Dallas offices. Like Blanche DuBois, “I’ve always depended on the kindness of strangers.”

DALLAS: The building manager generously permitted us to to do this shot in the lobby of my client’s Dallas offices. Like Blanche DuBois, “I’ve always depended on the kindness of strangers.”


TORONTO: This was the last stop on our 6 week itinerary. Toronto had the advantage of ending our job with only a ninety minute flight back home to New York - by far the shortest leg of all.

TORONTO: This was the last stop on our 6 week itinerary. Toronto had the advantage of ending our job with only a ninety minute flight back home to New York - by far the shortest leg of all.


The last situation we covered before running off to the airport for our return back to the States. This marked the end to one of my most memorable and extensive shoots after 6 weeks of traveling.

The last situation we covered before running off to the airport for our return back to the States. This marked the end to one of my most memorable and extensive shoots after 6 weeks of traveling.

Group Portraits on Location

URS Corporation, responsible for enormous projects such as the Hoover Dam and the Panama Canal has trusted me for over 15 years to photograph their engineers in dramatic settings around the world. Rather than depicting people in working situations they allowed me to take a more interpretive approach, featuring their people and projects in group portraits. Over the years, group portraits have become a strong point of my photography.

URS Corporation, responsible for enormous projects such as the Hoover Dam and the Panama Canal has trusted me for over 15 years to photograph their engineers in dramatic settings around the world. Rather than depicting people in working situations they allowed me to take a more interpretive approach, featuring their people and projects in group portraits. Over the years, group portraits have become a strong point of my photography.


74 of the URS people responsible for engineering the United States Courthouse in Brooklyn, photographed early on a Sunday morning in the courthouse’s cavernous lobby. To get the detail and quality required my four assistants and I spent hours setting up hundreds pounds of lighting equipment.

74 of the URS people responsible for engineering the United States Courthouse in Brooklyn, photographed early on a Sunday morning in the courthouse’s cavernous lobby. To get the detail and quality required my four assistants and I spent hours setting up hundreds pounds of lighting equipment.

Overview of the entire lobby. The biggest challenge was getting everyone placed perfectly and lighting this enormous space without having our lights visible in the frame.

Overview of the entire lobby. The biggest challenge was getting everyone placed perfectly and lighting this enormous space without having our lights visible in the frame.

URS engineers off the coast of Southern California with an offshore oil rig that they designed. We arranged for a good sized yacht that would be stable and high enough to line up visually with the rig. Fortunately, it was a beautiful, calm day on the water.

URS engineers off the coast of Southern California with an offshore oil rig that they designed. We arranged for a good sized yacht that would be stable and high enough to line up visually with the rig. Fortunately, it was a beautiful, calm day on the water.

A temple in New Delhi was chosen as the backdrop for URS engineers. My assistant and I went to the location the day before the shoot to carefully plan out the positions of all our subjects, taking into account the direction and quality of the light at sunset. With only the two of us to rehearse the group portrait, my assistant stood in for each of the 15 anticipated subjects and then used Photoshop to combine the different positions.

A temple in New Delhi was chosen as the backdrop for URS engineers. My assistant and I went to the location the day before the shoot to carefully plan out the positions of all our subjects, taking into account the direction and quality of the light at sunset. With only the two of us to rehearse the group portrait, my assistant stood in for each of the 15 anticipated subjects and then used Photoshop to combine the different positions.


We used two enormous electronic flash units to help the subjects stand out against the background. Our URS hosts graciously helped keep them steady in the wind. Packing just the right photo equipment and lighting for our international shoots is a critical part of planning. One must plan for many unknowns without getting bogged down by too much weight, exorbitant excess baggage fees, and customs documents.

We used two enormous electronic flash units to help the subjects stand out against the background. Our URS hosts graciously helped keep them steady in the wind. Packing just the right photo equipment and lighting for our international shoots is a critical part of planning. One must plan for many unknowns without getting bogged down by too much weight, exorbitant excess baggage fees, and customs documents.

I strive to keep our shoot time to a minimum, especially because group photos take so many people away from their demanding jobs. Shooting near sunset further complicates the timing. Just before the golden hour ten additional, unplanned subjects showed up. We shifted gears quickly and fit everyone in nonetheless, even leaving room in the center for a double page spread with a gutter in the print version of their annual report.

I strive to keep our shoot time to a minimum, especially because group photos take so many people away from their demanding jobs. Shooting near sunset further complicates the timing. Just before the golden hour ten additional, unplanned subjects showed up. We shifted gears quickly and fit everyone in nonetheless, even leaving room in the center for a double page spread with a gutter in the print version of their annual report.


Takenobu Igarashi: Design and Fine Art

GRAPHIS PRESS recently commissioned me to photograph the renowned Japanese graphic designer and artist, Takenobu Igarashi, for his new book, “Takenobu Igarashi: The creative journey of a Japanese Master”.  I flew to Sapporo to meet the artist, scout, and plan a three day portrait and documentary film.

My favorite portrait of the artist and the one chosen by Graphis for his book. This location was also used for his video interview in  my short documentary

My favorite portrait of the artist and the one chosen by Graphis for his book. This location was also used for his video interview in my short documentary

Photographing Igarashi at the Kazenobi atalier+gallery in front of one of his terra cotta sculptures.

Photographing Igarashi at the Kazenobi atalier+gallery in front of one of his terra cotta sculptures.

Sakura Nomiyama, Design Historian for the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and Takenobu Igarashi visit the artist's Dragon Spine sculpture in Hokkaido.

Sakura Nomiyama, Design Historian for the Cooper Hewitt, Smithsonian Design Museum and Takenobu Igarashi visit the artist's Dragon Spine sculpture in Hokkaido.

Photographing Igarashi from within one of many sculptures exhibited in the Kazenobi atelier+gallery (dedicated solely to Takenobu Igarashi’s art) in Hokkaido, Japan. Thousands of shapes cut freehand by the artist make up this enormous painted wooden sculpture.

Photographing Igarashi from within one of many sculptures exhibited in the Kazenobi atelier+gallery (dedicated solely to Takenobu Igarashi’s art) in Hokkaido, Japan. Thousands of shapes cut freehand by the artist make up this enormous painted wooden sculpture.

One of seven portrait situations that Igarashi sat for during my three days in Hokkaido.

One of seven portrait situations that Igarashi sat for during my three days in Hokkaido.

Sapporo, Japan stairwell with graphics designed by Takenobu Igarashi.

Sapporo, Japan stairwell with graphics designed by Takenobu Igarashi.